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Contest Results News

Eddie Hall Wins 2018 Britain’s Strongest Man

Eddie Hall wins Britain’s Strongest for the 5th straight year while being pushed the whole contest by Graham Hicks who ended up in second with Terry Hollands coming back with a good run on the Atlas Stones to take third place.



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News Upcoming Contests Worlds Strongest Man

2018 Worlds Strongest Man Events

A contest, where news is perennially held in secrecy, we are finally starting to get some information on the 2018 Worlds Strongest Man competition. After a very static and heavy 2017 contest, it looks like we are going back to more medleys and events that were familiar at Worlds Strongest Man 10 years ago, including the barrel squat and deadlift.



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News Upcoming Contests

Britain’s Strongest Man 2018 Preview

Britain’s Strongest Man is back this weekend Saturday 1/27/18 at the FLY DSA Arena in Sheffield, U.K and Worlds Strongest Man Eddie Hall is going for his 5th straight title which would be a new record.



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News Strongman Records

Andrew Clayton Breaks 105kg/231lb Axle C&P World Record With 188kg/415lb

2018 105kg Worlds Strongest Man Andrew Clayton headed to The Copper State Record Breakers contest in Avondale, Arizona on January 20th, 2018 hosted by Pritchett Power Strength Training to attempt to break the standing Axle Clean & Press record held by Vladimir Reksha of the Ukraine at 180kg/396lbs.



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Uncategorized

2018 Arnold Pro Strongwoman Events & Athletes

The Arnold Pro Strongwoman contest is back for its second year with even stronger competitors and new events. One of the most prestigious contests in all of Strongwoman with great exposure at the Arnold Classic and one of the biggest pay days in the sport.



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Interviews Strong Talk Podcast

Strong Talk Podcast 108: Eric Dawson

Eric Dawson is a Pro Strongman in the heavyweight division who has competed internationally including wins in The Strongman Champions League. Eric also owns one of the top Strongman gyms in the country Titan Barbell.



 

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Articles Tom Hibbert

Considerations for Improving your Super Yoke

By Tom Hibbert



The Yoke is one of those disciplines that has a good carryover to other events. If your Yoke is going well, then you can bet your squat and deadlift are also seeing improvements. The main reasoning is that the improved hip and core stability that is so vital with the Yoke, will transfer to your compound lifts & also other moving events.

Speed is King

The Yoke is predominantly a speed event. You don’t see many max Yoke efforts like they’ve had in the Arnold Classic. The fastest guy from A to B wins, not the strongest. Training to improve maximal speed is different to training to enhance maximal strength.

Speed requires quality over quantity. This is where a stop watch will come in handy. The principle is that you only keep the volume (total workload) as long as intensity (speed) is kept. I allow my athletes a 7% drop maximum. It’s better to stop once this performance drop has occurred than to continue at a slower speed or reduce the weight. Any sets after this will be junk sets and simply impact performance & recovery negatively.

Analyze your Weakness

Are you weak at the start, is it your maximum speed or maybe you struggle with acceleration. Analyzing this can then allow you to break the event into parts and then as you get towards the competition you can put it all together.

Here are some further ideas you can apply to your training:

Multiple Pick Ups

This will benefit the start of your Yoke run. You simply specific 2-5 pick-ups before completing your run. The focus will be on the speed of each pick-up. It will also act as a pre-fatigue method, which means when you return to a single pick up, it will feel easy.

Start Stops

This involves running an initial set distance, coming to a dead stop without dropping the yoke and then re-accelerating to the end. The deceleration component indirectly transfers to a performance improvement, through helping to prevent injuries via an increased time under tension & eccentric forces. It’s the fact you have to re-accelerate that will be of benefit to you.

Contrast Training

This is a method that utilizes Post Activation Potentiation. Simply put, picking up a heavy weight followed by a lighter weight, will make the lighter weight seem even lighter than usual. An easy way to do this would be a heavy pick up followed by a lighter run.

Be careful of wanting to go too heavy too soon on the heavy pick-up. The key is to focus on the lighter run and the speed of this and not an enormous pick-up. Injuries from spinal compression are easy to come by, so I recommend you also decompress post workout.

Improve your Olympic Style Squat

Improving this will increase hip stability as well as knee. It is doubtful that you will be carrying the Yoke low bar, so tension will be on your quads more than your posterior chain due to your upright posture. From a psychological point of view, I know that the closer my high bar Olympic squat is to the competition Yoke weight, the more confident I am at being able to sprint with it.

So there you have it. I hope this article is thought provoking for you or helps to freshen up your training. The only constant is change so utilizing different methods will only help your body adapt and get stronger.

P.S. It’s a yoke, not a yolk. A yolk is the yellow part of the egg. Please stop calling it this when you post on social media 😉

Delicious but not a YOKE

 

Tom owns a private strength & conditioning facility in the UK (Winning Health Solutions) & a Strength Coach/Personal Trainer Education company (Winning Performance). He is also a 3 x national Strongman Champion at u90kg. Not only has he proved himself in the sport, but that of his clients as well. He can take a strongman from novice to the international stage, like with Aaron Page. He has taken other seasoned strongmen from obscurity to the same level, like Lee Forbister. With this success he has started to be sought out by many other competitors. Follow Tom and reach out for coaching on Facebook, Instagram @Tom.Hibbert1, Reach out for coaching at http://www.winning-performance.uk 

Categories
Articles Programming Tom Hibbert

Predictor Lifts in Strongman

By Tom Hibbert



Success leaves clues, and Charles Poliquin is one of the most well-known strength coaches alongside arguably being the most successful. With this in mind, I utilized his concept of predictor lifts to develop my own for the sport of Strongman.

The concept is simple: Improve your predictor lifts and in turn, this will improve your performance and success in your chosen sport.

Categories
Articles Programming Tom Hibbert Training

Weekly Training Structure for a Strongman

By Tom Hibbert



Principle 1: Never train more than 2 days in a row

Why? Strongman is a neural sport therefore ensuring adequate recovery is of paramount importance. Remember, in Strongman/woman, what you do in the gym has a direct effect on competition performance. It’s not like a 100m sprinter, where they have to also complete technical work alongside strength training.

So in essence, the better your performance in the gym, the better your performance in competition. A 3rd day in a row will simply lead to sub-par training, which will lead to sub-par performance. It’s a question of quality over quantity.

Principle 2: Prioritize your weakness

Why? A chain is only as strong as its weakest link. Balance between the predictor lifts will improve your performance more than becoming a one lift wonder.

*Principles are not rules. They’re not set in stone.

Taking Principle 1 & applying it to your week would give quite a few options. My preferred layouts are these:

Monday, Tuesday, Thursday, Friday

Benefits:

  • Weekend Rest: Most people work Monday to Friday, so having your training set out like this still leaves you plenty of time for family activities, trips away. Yes, Strongman is important, but having balance in your life even more so. In addition, not being at work enables enhanced recovery due to less stressors and more time to used advanced recovery methods.
  • 2 Days Complete Rest:  I have found having 48 hours with no training to have a huge effect on overall recovery, enabling a higher output when returning to the gym on the Monday.

Monday, Tuesday, Thursday, Saturday

  • Saturday: Although I prefer the above option this option enables you to take advantage of doing a longer event session, or even splitting the day into 2 sessions. Another advantage is the possibility of traveling to other gyms to train with stronger or simply like-minded individuals.

Taking Principle 1 & 2, let’s look at what we might prioritize on each day. The majority will do well and improve with this weekly layout:

Monday: Push Press

Tuesday: Lower 1 (Deadlift or Squat: whichever is the priority)

Thursday: Strict Press & Remedial

Friday: Lower 2 & Events (Opposite of Lower 1. If you did deadlift on Tuesday, then you squat here)

 

Benefits & other notes regarding this layout:

Monday

  • Placing Push Press here means you will be performing the movement requiring the highest amount of coordination when you are fresh. Arguably, this a full body day as you’ll be cleaning and pressing the Log/Axle/Dumbbell, not just pressing it.
  • You’ll be fully recovered, meaning no soreness in lower body or lower back which would then affect the performance of the lift negatively
  • This day should not be neurally fatiguing or muscle damaging to the point you are sore or tired for the following day. If it is, I would assume technique limitations in the clean and push press.

Tuesday

  • Knowing you have at least 24 hours complete rest before your strict press on Thursday, gives you the opportunity to crush deadlifts or squats. I highly recommend a second session in the PM if your schedule allows for it

Thursday

  • After the deadlift, the strict press is the most neurologically demanding movement you’re going to have. Hence the need for 24 hours rest before I recommend completing it.
  • Remedials to add in include shoulder stabilizers and grip work.

Friday/Saturday

  • I don’t believe every Saturday needs to be a long events session. I prefer utilizing two or even three small sessions within the day, rather than the traditional 4-6 events session. Usually more talking than training is actually happening on these days anyway.
  • Even if multiple sessions a day isn’t possible , I would still complete this session in under 55 minutes after warm up
  • Longer events sessions I would recommend no closer than 2 weeks out from competition, and at a frequency of every other week

Obviously, your priority will change according to the upcoming competition events you have to prepare for, but this will give you a good few tips to help you adjust your own training.

Tom owns a private strength & conditioning facility in the UK (Winning Health Solutions) & a Strength Coach/Personal Trainer Education company (Winning Performance). He is also a 3 x national Strongman Champion at u90kg. Not only has he proved himself in the sport, but that of his clients as well. He can take a strongman from novice to the international stage, like with Aaron Page. He has taken other seasoned strongmen from obscurity to the same level, like Lee Forbister. With this success he has started to be sought out by many other competitors. Follow Tom and reach out for coaching on Facebook, Instagram @Tom.Hibbert1, Reach out for coaching at http://www.winning-performance.uk 

Categories
Interviews Strong Talk Podcast

Strong Talk Podcast 107: Charles “Trey” Mitchell III

This weeks guest is Trey Mitchell, Trey won 2017 Strongman Corporation Amateur Nationals as a Super Heavyweight to earn his pro card a long with winning Official Strongman Games Giants Live Qualifier.